Some tech giants, Google and Apple among them, said many of the apparent vulnerabilities exposed in the documents have already been patched. Microsoft issued a statement Thursday saying most of the issues appeared to involve problems with older technology that had been addressed with more modern software systems. Most firms said they are continuing to evaluate the WikiLeaks information.

CIA spokesman Dean Boyd declined to vouch for the integrity of the WikiLeaks material. Boyd has stressed the CIA is prohibited from conducting electronic surveillance targeting individuals in the U.S. and “does not do so.”

“As we’ve said previously, Julian Assange is not exactly a bastion of truth and integrity,” Boyd said Thursday. “Despite the efforts of Assange and his ilk, CIA continues to aggressively collect foreign intelligence overseas to protect America from terrorists, hostile nation states and other adversaries.”

WikiLeaks says the CIA hacking division involved “more than 5,000 registered users and had produced more than a thousand hacking systems, trojans, viruses, and other ‘weaponized’ malware.” The information circulated among former government hackers and contractors, one of whom provided the website with portions of it, WikiLeaks claims.

The FBI launched a criminal investigation into the release of the document cache, a U.S. official told USA TODAY this week. The official, who was not authorized to comment publicly, said the inquiry will determine whether the disclosure represented a breach from the outside or a leak from inside the spy agency. A separate review will attempt to assess the damage caused by such the disclosure, the official said.

WikiLeaks has conducted a global crusade to expose government secrets through a series of controversial and sometimes embarrassing document dumps in recent years.

Assange sought asylum in Ecuador’s embassy more than four years ago to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he has been accused of sexual assault, and the United States, where he fears possible espionage charges. But his position is tenuous. Guillermo Lasso, the front-runner in Ecuador’s presidential runoff set for April 2, has said that if elected he will evict Assange.

Some tech giants, Google and Apple among them, said many of the apparent vulnerabilities exposed in the documents have already been patched. Microsoft issued a statement Thursday saying most of the issues appeared to involve problems with older technology that had been addressed with more modern software systems. Most firms said they are continuing to evaluate the WikiLeaks information.

CIA spokesman Dean Boyd declined to vouch for the integrity of the WikiLeaks material. Boyd has stressed the CIA is prohibited from conducting electronic surveillance targeting individuals in the U.S. and “does not do so.”

“As we’ve said previously, Julian Assange is not exactly a bastion of truth and integrity,” Boyd said Thursday. “Despite the efforts of Assange and his ilk, CIA continues to aggressively collect foreign intelligence overseas to protect America from terrorists, hostile nation states and other adversaries.”

WikiLeaks says the CIA hacking division involved “more than 5,000 registered users and had produced more than a thousand hacking systems, trojans, viruses, and other ‘weaponized’ malware.” The information circulated among former government hackers and contractors, one of whom provided the website with portions of it, WikiLeaks claims.

The FBI launched a criminal investigation into the release of the document cache, a U.S. official told USA TODAY this week. The official, who was not authorized to comment publicly, said the inquiry will determine whether the disclosure represented a breach from the outside or a leak from inside the spy agency. A separate review will attempt to assess the damage caused by such the disclosure, the official said.

WikiLeaks has conducted a global crusade to expose government secrets through a series of controversial and sometimes embarrassing document dumps in recent years.

Assange sought asylum in Ecuador’s embassy more than four years ago to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he has been accused of sexual assault, and the United States, where he fears possible espionage charges. But his position is tenuous. Guillermo Lasso, the front-runner in Ecuador’s presidential runoff set for April 2, has said that if elected he will evict Assange.